A report about a trip in Fouta (Guinea)

I just  read (January 2017) this report on the Lonely Planet forum. So interesting that I share it with you in its entirety : “This trip was a continuation of last year’s – here’s…

Source: A report about a trip in Fouta (Guinea)

Advertisements

The Flying Carpet – A Step Beyond

In 2005 I fulfilled my childhood dream of going to Timbuktu, a trip inspired by Richard Hallibuton’s book “The Flying Carpet – The Record of a Great Adventure”

In 2005 I fulfilled my childhood dream of going to Timbuktu, a trip inspired by Richard Hallibuton’s book “The Flying Carpet – The Record of a Great Adventure”

Since 2005 a lot has changed in the world…where before it was safe to travel off the beaten track, now you have to think twice, and then think again.  However, despite the threats – real or perceived, we all need to step outside our “comfort zone” now and again…

Whilst Timbuktu may be off-limits (according to the FCO), and with Al-Qaeda, Daesh/Isis etc. dominating the news, its enough to deter anyone from leaving the comfort of home!

But don’t be deterred from travelling, as by staying in your comfort zone, you’ll miss out on so much the world has to offer.

Travel brings you into contact with people who are not so very different from you or I. They have the same basic needs – food, shelter, jobs, money etc. – above all, people (in general) are not out to harm, but are more than willing to help.

In my travels, I have been shown extreme generosity and welcomed into homes by people who, quite often, could ill afford to put me up.

In some small way, the chance to travel allows me the opportunity to repay the kindness people have shown, by telling their story.

Travel allows that opportunity – to meet people, experience new cultures and to open your mind to new possibilities, so if you’ve got itchy feet, get out there and experience life.

Pico Iyer writing in Harper’s in 1993, said “I am simply a fairly typical product of a movable sensibility, living and working in a world that is itself increasingly small and increasingly mongrel. I am a multinational soul on a multinational globe on which more and more countries are as polyglot and restless as airports. Taking planes seems as natural to me as picking up the phone or going to school; I fold up my self and carry it around as if it were an overnight bag.”

Open your mind and the possibilities are endless.

Shaun Walbridge (January 2017)

West Africa revisited

Stepping out of the surgery with both arms feeling the effects of the freshly administered jabs (Typhoid, Rabies, Meningitis & Hep B), I’m ready for my return to West Africa!

Stepping out of the surgery with both arms feeling the effects of the freshly administered jabs (Typhoid, Rabies, Meningitis & Hep B), I’m ready for my return to West Africa!

This time around, I’m heading off to Dakar (Senegal) to catch up with my friend Adolphus Mawalo from West Africa Democracy Radio before heading south to the Casamance region to spend a few days with Kath & Adam at the Kora Workshop in Kafountine, then on to stay with Simon & Khady at The Little Baobab in Abene.

In the meantime, trouble is brewing in The Gambia following the recent elections (December 2016) when Yahya Jammeh was voted out of office as president (which he accepted with seemingy good grace!). With the hand over to the president elect Adama Barrow due on 19 January 2017, it seems that Yahya has had a change of heart and is threatening to hold onto power. Just to make matters worse, the army chief  Ousman Badjie has also had a change of heart and is supporting the president’s attempt to stay in office. What this means for the future of The Gambia in the short term is uncertain, especially with rumours  of mercenaries being hired in from Liberia…

Subject to the political vagaries of The Gambia, all being well I will be continuing on to Sierra Leone to complete my aborted 2014 journey (I wasn’t able to get a visa due to the unwieldy Sierra Leone bureaucracy in their embassy in Conakry). This time around I’m applying for my visa in advance via the London embassy, rather than risking waiting until I reach the border.

With just over 4 weeks to go until my departure on 04 February 2017, I’m hoping that with the improved internet access in West Africa to be able to continue this blog until my return!