Losing My Religion 

Stripping out the rad by the roadside (having scrounged tools from passing drivers), the problem was all too obvious – in the UK it would be call the AA for a tow to the nearest garage, here there is no option but sort it. Luckily every good driver just happens to have a tube of FixIt in the tool box…

Well, it’s inevitable that if you travel by sept places, that you’ll break down at some point or another. In this case a loose bolt from cooling fan/water pump gouged a circle of holes in radiator, leading to total loss of coolant. Fearing the worse, I sat in the shade of a thorn bush whilst the driver got to work.

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Stripping out the rad by the roadside (having scrounged tools from passing drivers), the problem was all too obvious – in the UK it would be call the AA for a tow to the nearest garage, here there is no option but sort it. Luckily every good driver just happens to have a tube of FixIt in the tool box… a judicious application of araldite & sand, and the holes were fixed and we were under some 1 1/2 hours later. Apart from a pit stop after some kms to check all was well, we continued and arrivied into Touba some 2 hours late. Hats off to driver, all in a days work!

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The Mosque at Touba, is home to the Mouride order of the Sufi sect which was founded in 1887 by Cheikh Ahmadu Bamba Mbacke. The building of the Mosque was started in 1931, completing in 1967. It now comprises seven minarets which have been added over the years. The tallest minaret is know as Lamp Fall in honour of the founder Bamba – “Lamp Fall”being the name commonly seen adorning the back of cars and lorry’s.

Incidentally, they cannot exceed 7 minarets as this would be to compete with Mecca!

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Unfortunately at present, it is in the middle of a 5 year restoration project, which is replacing a lot of the marble and plaster work which was crumbling. Certainly the sample restoration work is exquisite and the finished Mosque will be something to see.

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Whilst not being able to enter the Mosque itself, I was free to wander around the exterior courtyards; luckily I had the services of the librarian Marabou Diabaye to take me around and show me the works. Part of the restoration includes replacing the white marble in the forecourts with travantine, as the marble gets too hot to walk on (needing to be bare footed to enter the Mosque).

Ignoring any question of religion (those who know me know my views), the Mosque is certainly a credit to the Muslim community, and no expense spared on the travantine and marble from Italy, lamps from Morrocco and Turkey, as well as the skills of the local tradesmen…

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